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Science Goes to the Movies 200s

Movie Review SeriesScience:Movies-Dr. Heather Berlin & Faith Salie
Producer: CUNY-TV
Rights: Unlimited, 6/2/16 to 6/1/18
13 x 30
High Definition

Free Series

Science Goes to the Movies is a monthly series, co-hosted by Faith Salie and Dr. Heather Berlin, that looks at the science in contemporary motion pictures. Guests are drawn from different scientific disciplines, illuminating scientific truths or imaginings in films like Burnt, The Hunger Games, In the Heart of the Sea, and more. The series encourages lively and informative conversation about concepts, as well as film portrayals of scientists and scientific inquiry, asking if there is real science behind a story, or if a screenwriter made something up. Is science leading dramatic imagination, or does imagination create new science? Faith Salie is a television and national public radio host, political and pop culture commentator, interviewer, journalist and actor. Dr. Heather Berlin is an American neuroscientist focusing on brain-behavior relationships affecting the prevention and treatment of psychiatric disorders.

Science Goes to the Movies guests have included Nadrian C. Seeman, Margaret & Herman Sokol Professor of Chemistry at NYU, Ruojie Sha, a Post-Doctorate Senior Research Scientist, also at NYU, Kent Kirshenbaum, Director of Graduate Studies; and Professor of Chemistry, Dr. Jill Bargonetti, Professor of Biological Sciences, Cornell physics professor Dr. Mukund Vengalattore, Jared Bernstein, Senior Fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and former Chief Economist and Economic Adviser to Vice President Joseph Biden, Fabien Cousteau, aquatic filmmaker and oceanographic explorer, plus many others.

Episode Descriptions:

Episode #201: Real Life Nanotech
Episode Description: Science Goes to the Movies, series co-hosts Dr. Heather Berlin and Faith Salie are joined by Nadrian C. Seeman, Margaret & Herman Sokol Professor of Chemistry at NYU, and Ruojie Sha, a Post-Doctorate Senior Research Scientist, also at NYU, to discuss nanotechnology as represented – and misrepresented – in the 2015 Marvel film Ant-Man.

Episode #202: Burnt, Cooking and Chemistry
Episode Description: We look at chemistry, cooking and Bradley Cooper. Using the film “Burnt,” co- host Faith Salie and Heather Berlin investigate the scientific underpinnings of creating the food we eat. Guest Kent Kirshenbaum, Director of Graduate Studies; and Professor of Chemistry shows us the latest in molecular gastronomy.

Episode #203: The Knick and Modern Medicine
Episode Description: Dr. Jill Bargonetti, Professor of Biological Sciences joins Science Goes to the Movies co-hosts, Faith Salie and Heather Berlin to discuss race, feminism, science and the implications of genetics in medicine as they relate to Clive Owen’s turn of the century drama “The Knick.” Currently, Dr. Bargonetti’s laboratory in the Belfer Research Building, focuses on mutant p53 proteins.

Episode #204: Dr. Who: Quantum Physicist
Episode Description: On episode 204 of Science Goes to the Movies, Cornell physics professor Dr. Mukund Vengalattore joins us to talk about Dr. Who’s Weeping Angels and the strange overlap of quantum reality and science fiction. Dr. Vengalattore explains to Faith and Heather that, on the quantum level time actually runs forward and backwards, and for a rare instance the scientific world becomes “very wibbly-wobbly timey-whimey”.

Episode #205: The Economics of the Hunger Games
Episode Description: Jared Bernstein, Senior Fellow at the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities and former Chief Economist and Economic Adviser to Vice President Joseph Biden, leads a rousing discussion on the economics of “The Hunger Games.” Looking at all four movies in the franchise, Bernstein clarifies major economic principals as they are reflected in the Panem economy.

Episode #206: In the Heart of the Sea, White Whales and Conservation
Episode Description: Fabien Cousteau, aquatic filmmaker and oceanographic explorer shares his insights into Ron Howard’s film “In the Heart of the Sea.” Cousteau, a third generation ocean conservationist shares personal memories of his grandparents, Simone and Jacques Cousteau and tells us what it’s like to live underwater for thirty-one straight days!

Episode #207: Inside Out and the Science of Comedy
Episode Description: Comedian Lewis Black (the voice of Anger) joins us for a look at Pixar’s Inside Out and a conversation about the neuroscience of comedy. Does laughter hit a particular part in our brain that infiltrates our deep rooted biases?

Episode #208: The Drama of Space Travel
Episode Description: Planetary scientist Sarah Stewart Johnson stops by to talk about The Martian, Matt Damon and how to best grow potatoes on Mars.

Episode #209: Mutants, Superheroes, and Genetics
Episode Description: Hemali Phatnani and Joe Pickrell, geneticists at the New York Genome Center join us for a discussion on genetic mutations. We look at major releases including X-Men, Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D. and The Boy for Gieta, a fascinating documentary about the treatment of albinos in Africa.

Episode #210: Deadpool, Cancer, and Immortality
Episode Description: Dr. Christopher Mason, Assoc. Professor of Computational Genomics and long time Deadpool fan is in the studio talking about the genetics of longevity and healing. Special guest host Emily Rice adds an air of physics to the superhero discussion.

Episode #211: Disaster Movies and You
Episode Description: Bill Nye stops by to talk to Faith and Heather about fictional disaster movies and the possibility of real life climate disasters.

Episode #212: Real Dragons
Episode Description: American Natural History curator, Mark Norell explains the origins of some fantastic beasts and shows us the paleontological underpinning of giants and cyclopes – not to mention the startling discovery that many dinosaurs were covered in bright colored feathers!

Episode #213: Physics and The Flash
Episode Description: Physicist David E. Kaplan (“Particle Fever”) offers a guide to the multiverse for filmmakers and other storytellers. Discussions include time travel, The Flash, and a physicists opinion on the Millennium Falcon’s ability to do the Kessel Run in 12 or 14 parsecs.


Feeddate/Time:    Thursdays beginning June 2, 2016 @ 1600-1630ET/HD04

            *Feed-For-Record*

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